INDIA`S ECONOMIC BOOMS – SO DOES POVERTY.

India is the nation with the highest population of about 1.2 billion people and the seventh biggest country on earth with an area of ​​3,287,000 km².

The country, which is characterized by strong counter-measures, has recorded growth rates of up to 10% over a period of years, and is one of the largest economies in the world with a gross domestic product (GDP) of USD 1644 billion. However, only a small proportion of the Indian population benefits from this impressive economic boom, as the majority of people in India still live in bitter poverty.

INDIA`S ECONOMIC BOOMS – SO DOES POVERTY.

India is the nation with the highest population of about 1.2 billion people and the seventh biggest country on earth with an area of ​​3,287,000 km².

The country, which is characterized by strong counter-measures, has recorded growth rates of up to 10% over a period of years, and is one of the largest economies in the world with a gross domestic product (GDP) of USD 1644 billion. However, only a small proportion of the Indian population benefits from this impressive economic boom, as the majority of people in India still live in bitter poverty.

FROM THE VILLAGE TO THE SLUM.

More than 800 million people are considered poor in India. Most of them live in the overpopulated countryside and make their living with casual jobs. The lack of livelihoods in rural areas drives many Indians to the rapidly growing metropolitan regions like Mumbai, Delhi, Bangalore or Kolkata.
There, most of them expect a life characterized by poverty and despair in the mega slums, consisting of millions of corrugated huts, without adequate drinking water supply, without garbage disposal and in many cases also without electricity. The bad hygiene conditions are the cause of diseases such as cholera, typhus and dysentery, in which children are mainly suffering and dying.

NO TIME TO PLAY AND LEARN.

Although child labor for 14-year-olds is forbidden by law in India, according to official data, 12.5 million children aged between 5 and 14 are working. Aid organizations believe that in reality there are still a lot more: 65 million children between 6 and 14 do not go to school. It is assumed that they instead contribute to the livelihood of their families. To ensure their own and the survival of their loved ones, Indian children work in the field, in factories, quarries, private households and prostitution, rather than go to school.

NO EDUCATION WITHOUT CHANCES.

According to UNICEF, around 25% of children in India have no access to education. The number of children excluded from school attendance is higher among girls than boys. Although women and men are equated with Indian law, girls and women are regarded as inferior, especially in the lower social class, and are oppressed by their fathers, brothers and husbands. Without education, the chances of an existence-assured workplace are virtually hopeless, and the life in poverty is programmed in India.

THE EFFECTS OF EDUCATION ON SOCIETY.

All researches of all major organizations show very clear that education has by far the best effect on the development of a society. Especially educated mothers are the key drivers for economic growth and social stability. Each year of education makes a big difference in the lives of many people.

FROM THE VILLAGE TO THE SLUM.

More than 800 million people are considered poor in India. Most of them live in the overpopulated countryside and make their living with casual jobs. The lack of livelihoods in rural areas drives many Indians to the rapidly growing metropolitan regions like Mumbai, Delhi, Bangalore or Kolkata.
There, most of them expect a life characterized by poverty and despair in the mega slums, consisting of millions of corrugated huts, without adequate drinking water supply, without garbage disposal and in many cases also without electricity. The bad hygiene conditions are the cause of diseases such as cholera, typhus and dysentery, in which children are mainly suffering and dying.

NO TIME TO PLAY AND LEARN.

Although child labor for 14-year-olds is forbidden by law in India, according to official data, 12.5 million children aged between 5 and 14 are working. Aid organizations believe that in reality there are still a lot more: 65 million children between 6 and 14 do not go to school. It is assumed that they instead contribute to the livelihood of their families. To ensure their own and the survival of their loved ones, Indian children work in the field, in factories, quarries, private households and prostitution, rather than go to school.

NO EDUCATION WITHOUT CHANCES.

According to UNICEF, around 25% of children in India have no access to education. The number of children excluded from school attendance is higher among girls than boys. Although women and men are equated with Indian law, girls and women are regarded as inferior, especially in the lower social class, and are oppressed by their fathers, brothers and husbands. Without education, the chances of an existence-assured workplace are virtually hopeless, and the life in poverty is programmed in India.

THE EFFECTS OF EDUCATION ON SOCIETY.

All researches of all major organizations show very clear that education has by far the best effect on the development of a society. Especially educated mothers are the key drivers for economic growth and social stability. Each year of education makes a big difference in the lives of many people.

WHAT CAN YOU DO TO HELP US?

As a very small and independent charity organization our work depend on our artners and donors. For us every single dollar or donation in kind matter and can make significant change for the life of the children we support.

SUPPORT US:

It needs just about 50 cents to educate a child for a day!

SUPPORT US:

It needs just about 50 Cents to educate a child for a day!

India

Donations within India may be sent to :

Concern for Humanity
Bank of India
Account No: 602210100022480
Panchsheel Branch
7-Panchsheel Shopping Centre
New Delhi – 110016
New Delhi India
IFSC Code BKID0006022

Worldwide
All donations from overseas may be sent to the following account:

Punjab National Bank, G – 6, Mehrauli Road, Hauz Khas, New Delhi – 110 016, India, Bank Branch No. 3093
Concern for Humanity, Account No. 3093000101115372, SWIFT Code No. PUNBINBBDOB, IFSC Code PUNB0309300

India
Donations within India may be sent to:

Concern for Humanity, Bank of India, Account No: 602210100022480, Panchsheel Branch, 7-Panchsheel Shopping Centre, New Delhi – 110016, New Delhi, India, IFSC Code BKID0006022

Worldwide

We are eligible to receive donations from abroad as well. All donations from overseas may be sent to the following account:

Punjab National Bank
G – 6, Mehrauli Road, Hauz Khas
New Delhi – 110 016, India
Bank Branch No. 3093
Concern for Humanity
Account No. 3093000101115372
SWIFT Code No. PUNBINBBDOB
IFSC Code PUNB0309300

All donations/contributions to Concern for Humanity are 50% exempt from Tax under section 80GGA of the Income Tax Act, Government of India. Concern for Humanity is also registered under Foreign Contribution Regulation Act (FCRA).
Please make all donations through Cheque or Demand Draft in favour of „Concern for Humanity“ and send them to us at: IInd Floor, Building No. 252/1, Shahpur Jat, New Delhi – 110 049. Phone No. + 91 4175 2365

Please contact Concern for Humanity for more information:

info@concernforhumanity.org or concernforhumanity@gmail.com

All donations/contributions to Concern for Humanity are 50% exempt from Tax under section 80GGA of the Income Tax Act, Government of India. Concern for Humanity is also registered under Foreign Contribution Regulation Act (FCRA).
Please make all donations through Cheque or Demand Draft in favour of „Concern for Humanity” and send them to us at: IInd Floor, Building No. 252/1, Shahpur Jat, New Delhi – 110 049. Phone No. + 91 4175 2365

Please contact Concern for Humanity for more information:

info@concernforhumanity.org 
concernforhumanity@gmail.com